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it and then again neither would he. >> jennifer: fierce fighting continued in israel and gaza today while leaders from both sides met in cairo to discuss putting an end to the bloodshed. egyptian president mohamud morsi is overseeing the talks and he has become the central figure in the delicate negotiations. morsi was at his sister's funeral today but he did issue a statement saying israeli aggression would end today. tuesday. at the end of the day the two sides still had not reached agreement. a hamas official told reuters they had come close but the talks "must wait until tomorrow." now this is morsi's real debut on the world stage. he rose from his position as head of the engineering department at a cairo university to become president of egypt last year. it's really an intriguing story. morsi replaced, as you know, president hosni mubarak who had been in power for three decades and was one of israel's few allies in the region and morsi ran as the muslim brotherhood's candidate and he promised to implement islamic law. bu
clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack in israel in four years. police say, however, the incident was not a suicide bombing. joining me now, former assistant secretary of state, p.j. crowley and from tel aviv, nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk. thank you, both. stephanie, i want to start with you, is the attack we were just discussing in tel aviv an indication that cease-fire talks are not actually on track? >> no, that's not the case, ari. they aren't necessarily connected. at the very least they're are probably -- it's probably complicating the conversations, but right now, the talks keep going on, the negotiations keep going on. israeli officials saying they still are looking for that guarantee that rockets aren't going to come out of gaza towards israel. that is their stipulation. we heard the defense minister ehud barak say today that right out of the gate, what they w
praising the new leader for his role in negotiating a cease fire between israel and hamas, well now when he took all these powers away from judges, they're in a tough spot. >> have some concerns about the decisions and declarations announced on november 22nd. democracy depends on strong institutions and the important checks and balances that provide accountability. >> so, today, there were nationwide protests continuing in egypt and a million person march of anti morsi protesters is scheduled for tomorrow in tahrir square. the very spot where the revolution that cleared the way for morsi's presidency was born. now, there was a planned counterprotest that was supposed to happen tomorrow. people thought the two happening at the same time could cause serious violence, but that was canceled and now, morsi says to say his rule and word is more important than judges is just temporary. and not even is buying that. the cover of the egypt daily news website today proclaimed egypt's new pharaoh. a chip off the old mubarak block. and morsi, lincoln in deguise or another mubarak. and the stock market d
conflict between israel and gaza. today jerusalem became a target of palestinian rocket fire. air-raid sirens rang out in the capital tel aviv. at least one incoming missile landed in the jerusalem outskirts. the israeli military continued to pound gaza with air strikes, but is not saying that a ground assault may be necessary to stop the rocket fire coming from gaza. it all happened on a day that was supposed to be marked by a cease-fire. at least 23 palestinians and 3 israelis have been killed since israel began the air strike offensive two days ago. israel has called up thousands of troops and seems poised to go into the palestinian territory. >> israel will continue to exercise the prudence and self-restraint while defending our citizens against terrorism. >> nbc is reporting from a second day from gaza. what's the situation as we see nightfall there behind you? >> reporter: tamron, it's pitch-black behind me. it has an eerie silence to it. i can tell you from having stayed "up all night" yesterday to the sounds of israeli explosions, that's what people are bracing themselves
turmoil. >> former defense -- well, defense minister and former prime minister in israel has announced he's not seeking a position in the next cabinet after the election. does this signal anything about the situation vis-a-vis iran since he was one of the most hawkish of the cabinet members on iran? >> no doubt it reflects i'm sure a set of personal considerations for him, but the fact is he has been the architect of the options vis-a-vis iran, he has been the one who basically has outlined why it has to be dealt with, even though he wants to put it in the context of close u.s./israeli relations. ultimately israel has to find a way to deal with it either on its own or with us. >> israel has talked about a ship that's loaded with rockets potentially heading to gaza. so is there another crisis brewing? where do we stand with the cease-fire, where both sides seem to be testing each other the last few days? >> i believe the cease-fire in fact is going to hold. if you look at all three parties who were involved in it aside from the united states, who i think did play a pivotal role at the end.
. >> a big day in the middle east. today both israel and gaza meet to further the cease-fire between the two embattled nations. we're going to have a live report coming up for you. >> gray thursday, black friday, and now cyber monday. but just how good are the deals today, compared to what was put out this past holiday weekend? we're going to break it all down for you. >> did you do any shopping? >> absolutely not. there's too much football. >> don't you love it? >> good morning. welcome to "early start," i'm john berman. >> and i'm zoraida sambolin. 5:00 a.m. in the east. so let's get started. they are back. our lame duck congress returning to capitol hill today. the senate in session this afternoon. the house back tomorrow. and with 35 days left, as john just reminded us, before we plunge down the fiscal cliff, two prominent republican senators, lindsey graham and saxby chambliss are signaling they are willing to give a break the no tax pledge. that is a hopeful sign, folks, because a new cnn/orc poll shows more than two thirds of americans believe a trip over that cliff would create major
broker that peace between -- that cease-fire between hamas and israel. perhaps thinking that he is suddenly a leader on the world stage he decided to announce that all of the decisions he has made since assuming office in january cannot be challenged by the egyptian courts. as you can see a number of especially young people in egypt none too pleased about this. they have been protesting in cairo and alexandria and other places. morsi of course an islamist, a member of the muslim brotherhood, the ideological ally of hamas. it is yet to be seen what the response will be from the obama administration to these new powers that he has awarded himself. he has also ordered a new trial for his predecessor hosni mubarak. we will continue to watch the troubles developing inee lit up and the protest both in favor of and against that country's president. we'll keep an eye on it "happening now." also this fox news alert, holiday shoppers nationwide out in droves to take advantage of black friday tkaoerblgs man black friday deals, many of them cutting thanksgiving short to get in lines. they a
-fire for israel and hamas. any details have yet to be worked out. the next direct talks happen in k cairo. meanwhile, the military is not commenting on the long oh-range rockets, the same type that were fired into israel. hamas says the can conflict caused $1.2 billion to the economy. >>> in egypt, dueling rallies are planned. police and protesters are planned at tahrir square. jim maceda is live in cairo. can you put a perspective on this? i understand there are going to be demonstrations from both sides. >> that's absolutely right. i'll tell you, alex, you won't see many of them down below me here in tahrir square, nor will you see them throwing rocks at the police. but the average egyptians, since there's no polling on this, they are just as worried and angry about what morsi has done. morsi in putting his own will, his own voice above the wall, that he's, in fact, snuffing out the will of the people and all those other voices of egyptians who are not muslim brotherhood. many egyptians were killed down below and up to 11 thour,000, i understand, wounded since the uprising, did that in
east. elections are coming up in israel, in jordan, in egypt, iran and elsewhere. we're seeing in front of our eyes more violent change happening in syria. the reverberations of which are being felt on everyone of that country's borders. elsewhere from beirut to bahrain domestic politics is at a low boil ready to burst out in a way that can affect our interests in very fundamental ways. there are two problems at the far ends of the threat spectrum. the iran nuclear challenge on the one hand and the spread of al qaeda and affiliated terrorism on the other that will continue to dominate and lest we forget within a year of taking office both presidents obama and bush, his predecessor, were faced with previously unforeseen events that fundamentally challenged their middle east policies. 9/11 for president bush and the arab spring for president obama. so there's a lot on the agenda. today we're going to take a early look at what will be and what should be the foreign policy of a second obama administration in the middle east. now we at the washington institute, for us this is just the beginn
to witness the vote. the united states, israel and other western countries oppose this move by the palestines. palestinians. more than a dozen european countries are supporting this rez lug. the uk says it may vote yes pending a couple of conditions. the u.s. has supported a two-state resolution for palestinians and israelis. why do american officials oppose u.n. recognition? >> for the most part it won't give the palestinians what they want, which is an actual state. this vote is largely symbolic. it would have no effect on the palestinian sovereignty or borders or any of the things they're looking for. israel is vehemently opposed to this vote. it said it threatened to cut off aid to the palestinians, impose new checkpoints if they do so. what the u.s. is fearing here is that if this vote goes ahead, and we see that it's pretty much a guarantee that it will -- that the palestinians will be upgraded at the u.n., basically it's not going to lead to anything good on the ground. what the u.s. is afraid of is that it will lead to more violence if the palestinians don't see their state actually r
bogus items. syria used distraction of fighting between israel and palestinians to resupply government troops in syria. correspondent leland vittert has the evidence. >> bretevidence >> reporter: they have been firing off and appearing ready for battle. the western intelligence sources tell fox news the men are ire rainian revolutionary guard troops coming to help bashar assad in the syria long civil war. they have exploited the attention on syria to ramp up the flight. often sending ton of ammunition, weapon and equipment multiple times a week. they are flying via rocky air space. the u.s. put pressure on iraq. iraq is inspecting the planes but sources say it's done on the return flight. when the plane is empty to appease the u.s. keep the flight coming. 18 months since the civil war. deflection from the syrian army means that assad has less well-trained men. >> recent rebel takeover have robbed the soldiers of equipment. and the army is running low on ammunition. >> while diplomatic pressure from united states is the only thing to stop iran shipments via iraqi air space, in israel th
, praised effusively by u.s. officials for his role in mediating the israel/gaza fight. back to you in new york. gregg: it just goes to show you how quickly events can turn around in that region of the world. steve heir began, we'll check back with you a bit later on. thanks very much, in cairo. patti ann: and another hotbed in that region, the hamas terror group is now accusing israel of breaking ceasefire rules two days after a truce was reached along the israel/gaza border. israeli officials say they will investigate reports that a palestinian man was killed. israel has arrested several palestinians suspected of blowing up a bus in tel aviv. we'll bring you the latest on that when we have that. gregg: those are just a few of the many stories we are following this morning. a busy day in "america's newsroom." >>> plus, a boat trip turning deadly off the coast of florida. how 23 people ended up in a fight for their lives. patti ann: and tragedy on the highway. a chain reaction crash causing a 140-car pile-up. we'll tell you how this happened. gregg: plus, ambassador susan rice under fire f
sophisticated rocket technology to hezbollah. this poses an enormous security threat to israel. we've seen that play out in gaza. so there are a lot of issues before the administration. many, many very serious, but none bigger than iran in stopping them sort of a nuclear weapon is a very urgent national priority. >> nicolas burns, thank you very much. thanks for joining us. >> thank you. >>> and still ahead, trying not to fall off that cliff. we have it all covered with white house economic adviser alan krueger, democratic congressman elijah cummings and later house republican tom price. you're watching "andrea mitchell reports" only on msnbc. ♪ i'd like to thank eating right, whole grain, multigrain cheerios! mom, are those my jeans? [ female announcer ] people who choose more whole grain tend to weigh less than those who don't. multigrain cheerios go ahead, mark your calendars. tend to weigh less than those who don't. it's the last day you can switch your medicare part d plan. we're ready, and we can't wait to switch. [ male announcer ] make the switch to an aarp medicarerx plan, insur
-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constitution is drafted, he is the most powerful man in egypt, and, technically, he can do whatever he wants without any apparent oversight. that's why he is being called egypt's new dictator. that's why you have thousands of protests taking place behind us in tahrir square. the protesters represent the opposing factions, the liberals, the secularists, women's rights groups, the youth groups. essentially, their position is that we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he rescinds his decrees, and we spoke to one of his top advisors today, and he said he'll consider that, but first there needs to be a dialogue. let's take a listen to the advisor. >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make? >> this decision is up to the president. not for us. >> is it possible -- is it possible -- >> we are ready for our dialogue. >> are
between israel and hamas? they're happening in egypt today. >> and $59 billion! retail records broken as americans crowded stores for some competitive shopping over the weekend. and now cyber monday is here. will shoppers be in even more of a spending mood? >> you want to talk about money? a new powerball jackpot. a new record in the cash payout. it's unreal. >> a packed two hours ahead for you this morning. new jersey congressman bill pascrell will be joining us, grover norquist, jamie rubin, dr. hanan ashrawi, will be our guest, peter billingsley from a christmas story, and grinle college hoops star jack taylor. remember him? big game he had the other day. and the one and only tony bennett, monday, november 26th. welcome, everybody, "starting point" this morning. is that a hint of compromise in the air on capitol hill? 35 days left till we reach the fiscal cliff. and a couple of key republicans are now suggesting that they're willing to forego their no tax pledge to try to get a budget deal done and avoid massive tax hikes, and spending cuts that will come in the new year. brand-new
, egypt, this morning. as you know egypt has been a key player in brokering the cease-fire between israel and hamas. today in cairo, mediators continue talks with israel. topics will include opening border crossing and easing israel's economic blockade in gaza. the ongoing talks come as the palestinian authority leaders go before the united nations this week to renew their bid for statehood. >>> also new this morning, israel's defense minister says he will leave his post in january. ehud barak says he wants to spend more time with his family. but there's been a lot of buzz he's forming a new party. he's led israel's military for the last five years and served as the nation's prime minister for a couple of years before that. >>> is it over, grover? republicans back away from grover norquist's anti-tax pledge. what do republicans want in return? that's our talk back question today. ♪ [ gordon ] for some this line is a convenience. how you doing today? i'm good thanks. how are you? i'm good. [ gordon ] but for others, it's all they can afford. every day nearly nine million older americans
cause of death is listed as a stroke. many palestinians believe he was poisoned by israel. that something israel denies. the bottom line here in life he was controversial and in death, bill, he also remains very controversial. bill: what is this pallonium poison? >> it is a radioactive element that can be extremely, extremely deadly. according to u.s. regulatory, nuclear regulatory commission it emits radiation that can essentially destroy human tissue. it can not we are told penetrate skin. if ingested it can cause deadly harm to dna, to main body organs and as well as we are told the immune system. and this particular isotope is so powerful, bill, that we're told that an amount as small as the size of a grain of salt can be deadly. another thing to keep in mind is that it decays very, very quickly. it has a very short half-life. in other words, officials say, after 2 1/2 years it might be very hard to detect. that means after arafat has been buried since 2004, whatever results are reached might in fact be inconclusive. bill? bill: david lee miller, a good mystery you hav
, on the constitution and the attack on the judges right after he brokered the deal between israel and hamas. so he was already rending services in the international community and then asking for a license at home. it's really basically a page from the book of hosni mubarak. i think in washington, there is great uncertainty, what to do with the islamists in power. this is not just from this crisis of november 2b 22nd, this crisis of the last week behind us. this has been the case since the fall of the dictatorship of hosni mubarak, what to do with the islamists in egypt, what to do with the islamists in tunisia and what to do with the rise of the islamists in the region as a whole. >> over the weekend, senator john mccain said, our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy. if you add up all the economic and military assistance the u.s. gives egypt every year, it's about $1.5 billion. should that be used as leverage to try to get egypt back on this democracy road? >> well, i usually have great deference to the opinions of senator mccain. i see things on national security th
between israel and hamas is facing a test this morning. amid reports of a deadly shoot i ing. it happened in the border town of khan younis. sara sidner is in jerusalem. what can you tell us about this, sara? >> reporter: carol, we're hearing from the health ministry in gaza, saying the 25 people were injured, one person killed in the past 24 hours. they're saying that it was farmers who were in the area of east of khan younis in gaza, border area. we also heard from the israeli military who has a very different story, saying several groups of men had come up to the border, the fence, tried to go over on to the israeli side, protesting israel, that the soldiers fired in the air as a warning shot and then fired at their legs. the israeli military not commenting and not confirming yet because they're investigating whether or not someone was killed or whether there are any injuries. but at this point the health department is saying that, indeed, there were several injuries. this is coming at a very intense time. as you know, it's not even been 48 hours since the cease fire was put in place a
as egypt's president expands his power on the heels of helping to broker a ceasefire between israel and hamas. >>> new egyptian leader, same old story for the u.s. relationship? good morning from washington. it's monday, november 26, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm chuck todd. welcome back from the long break. let's get right to my first reads of the morning. congressional leaders return to washington this week and with just 36 days left to avert the so-called fiscal cliff becoming more apparent that senate republicans want a deal and they would like one pretty quick. but while there may be a bi-p t bipartisan consensus to raise taxes on the wealthy, the sides are still far apart on where the revenue will come from. staff level negotiations are a little bit more than stalled. not fully stalled but they didn't go so great last week and it's unclear where speaker boehner will get the votes for a deal that would raise tax rates. which is why he's pushing against that idea. two senate republicans up for re-election in 2014 have bucked norquist saying they are willing to let taxe
, of course, israel. that is still to be proven, to be proven whether he was even killed at all, whether he died of natural causes. so here at the shrine behind me in ramallah yasser arafat's shrine today the experts from russia, france, and switzerland join the palestinians in taking specimens of yasser arafat's remains. they're going to study those specimens in their laboratories in their countries. they say it will take three months to get a full result. and then they'll know how he died. now the claims that he was murdered, if he was murdered, he was poisoned, became -- well, you know, for eight years, no one really dealt with the issue until al jazeera tv earlier this year did a documentary reporting that they have confirmed that he died of poisoning of plutonium 210, the same allegedly used to kill a spy turned can dissident. if he was poisoned with with mew tone yum, who did it? if it turns out he was poisoned, they need to find out who did it and that's a whole different investigation. i guess it becomes a criminal investigation as opposed to this kind of medical examination. >> and
he may have been poisoned by israel. a claim israel denies. he died in paris in 2004, a month after falling suddenly ill at his west bank compound. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. >>> the high financial cost of hurricane sandy is coming into focus. new york has requested $42 billion in aid and new jersey officials estimate they suffered at least $29 billion in losses, bringing the total of $71 billion in the two hardest hit states. sandy was in some ways worse than hurricane katrina, citing the high economic cost and property destruction. meanwhile, a top executive and a trustee for the power company have resigned in the wake of the company's slow response in getting power back to new yorkers on long island. >>> here's a look at some of the other stories topping the news right now. a fast-moving storm system sweeping through the mid-atlantic this morning bringing a wet mixture of rain and snow. the storm is expected to put down 1 to 3 inches of snow from west virginia
there are ceasefire talks going on in cairo dealing with hamas and israel. what's the latest on that? >> reporter: that's right. of course, the ceasefire between the palestinians and israelis was declared last wednesday. the fighting stopped but some of the details is yet to be hammered out. and that's what's happening in cairo today, between the israelis and the palestinians with egypt playing the role of mediator. these two sides have to work out a lot of very difficult topics. among them, the economic blockade of gaza, travel in the crossings, and then the alleged smuggling of illegal weapons into gaza from egyptian territory. a lot of tangled topics to tackle. history shows these are not easy issues to solve, but they're going to have a go at it with egypt playing the role of mediator, john. >> thanks, reza sayah in cairo this morning. great work today. thanks. >>> we're also following a remarkable story involving the late palestinian leader, yassir arafat. beginning tomorrow, arafat's body will be exhumed so investigators can figure out once and for all whether the head of the plo had been p
riding on this. palestinians not only believe he was poisoned there's only one culprit, israel. if he was appointed and it was by israel, of course, who knows what the ramifications of that would be on the street. yeah, they want to make sure that the investigation is done as fairly and as objectively as possible. so what happened is they took 20 specimens from his bones today. those 20 specimens were divided into three, and each set of investigators from russia, france and switzerland took their 20 samples. they'll be doing separate investigations, and then they correlate the results to the end and we'll see whether they will agree or whether there's any dispute. there's a lot riding on this, of course. >> martin fletcher live in tel aviv. thank you. >>> new allegations involving former elmo puppeteer kevin clash. it tops our look at stories around the "news nation" today. a third lawsuit accuses clash of having sex with an underage boy. the latest accuser said he began a relationship with clash back in 2000. he was 16 years old at the time. a spokes woman for clash says, quote, mr.
. there was the agreement with israel, mubarak was an ally of the united states, a cut off aid not good to his own people but cooperated with us with the war on terror. all of the ingredients were there 18 months ago they are still there but 75% of the population is under the age of 30. they don't have jobs and the prospects. they toppled their dictator but things have not got better so they are back on the streets. >> did we misinterpret what the appraise saying was about? arab sprained, fighting for there rights when it was about religion? >> more about economic prospects. revolutions happen with a large baby-boom population. american revolution. chinese revolution, french revolution. even eastern europe and the soviet union. with a population bubble when you add economic disaster with good prospects down the road people take to the streets the economy in egypt has not gotten better. >> then to have the right course of the track them to replace with another dictator. >> that has not because of political stability. they are getting their money out with business opportunities and prospects so people are
responsibility. >> the truce is holding between hamas and israel after eight days of fighting. palestinian students were now feeling free enough to walk back to school. and with israeli troops retreated from the border, hamas officials have announced the restriction on palestinian fishermen has been loosened as part of the cease-fire deal. fishermen are now permitted to head out six miles offshore rather than just three. >>> in syria, rebels claim they have overrun a key base west of aleppo and purged the assad regime from a whole swath of land near the iraqi border, but the killing continues. according to a major opposition group, 32 fepeople have been killed across syria today. >>> here in the states, the focus is retail shopping. black friday may be history, but the hunt for bargains is far from over. that's because we've still got cyber monday ahead of us. it looks like it could be the busiest ever. trish is the host of "street smart" on bloomberg tv. good to see you. >> good to see you, fredricka. >> i know we don't know exactly how well the retailers did on black friday, especially s
or not egypt would have a role, maybe a cease-fire between hamas and israel. we did see that come to fry tuition. this week we're talking about something completely different, michael. what should the role of the united states be? and what have you heard about reports potentially of military coup, the military in egypt we supported so much over the years rising up against morsi? >> well, jenna, this is sort of back to the future because remember hosni mubarak wanted a deal with the united states got one for a long time, look he will be responsible player in the region but you ignore what he does inside of egypt. this is coming right on the heels of gaza. the last move morsi made was on the heels of a big terrorist attack in the sinai. he is hoping for a free pass from the united states and international community. ignore what i'm doing at home and concentrate on my role in the region. i think it is important we not do that. as for the military, jenna, you remember the supreme council of armed forces. nobody talks about them because morsi usurped the role they had in all. i'm not sure the
. >> the indications we have or the convictions we have that israel have done this assassination but yet we still need evidence. >> israel meantime denied those allegations. >>> a fiery scene in downtown sydney, australia, today. look at this with me and you'll see a cab, look at this, of a construction crane engulfed in flames, black smoke. it gets worse. because this is the moment when the crane, this arm here collapses, falls into a building, barely misses the busy street below. here's where the story gets a little bit more intriguing. the operator of the crane was also the manager of the crane that collapsed in new york during superstorm sandy. >>> drugs, gangs, murder. one expert says that is exactly what many americans think of mexico and the country's newest leader here, the president elect, about to set down with president obama in washington. just about an hour from now. coming up next, what this could mean for the immigration fight in america. ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp out. you know we've been open all night. is this a trick to get my
and what i think about that. >> yes. >> any time israel is involved in a story, did becomes excruciatingly -- id becomes excruciatingly difficult to cover, because there is a sense of identity in this country with israelis, and many reporters, old friends and colleagues of mine used to be criticized for taking an anti-israeli point of view. he spent many years living in the arab world and had a sympathetic. of view to arabs. i think what is happening in gaza right now meets in the definition of tragedy. the israelis cannot be expected to stand by while their cities are rocketed. on the other hand, the idea that the israeli defense forces are equally professional, the number of casualties on the palestinian side are going to be much greater. they are leaving an impression there is something unfair. this is the time you need correspondents who have spent years in the region, because by and large, you ask what i think of the coverage. i think it is surface. it focuses on the casualties. you do not know what the possibilities may be for agreement on the sides. i think that is one thing we have
against israel. two thirds of the member nations have recognized the state of palestine. republican congressman tom cole, in a private meeting yesterday, urged colleagues to vote to extend the bush-era tax rates for all but the highest earners through the end of the year, and said he believes such a vote would not violate the grover norquist anti-tax pledge and that he is not alone. he served in official posts within the party. the article says he might provide cover for other republicans. we will hear from grover norquist at kennecott -- at 10:00 a.m. eastern here on c- span. >> 16 or 17 basis, we have military-run schools, and the average cost educate a child per year is $50,000, almost four times with the rest of public education costs. -- what the rest of public education costs. we could take the money we're spending today, and pay every public school system $14,000 per child and save billions of dollars per year with the same or better outcomes. host: this weekend you can talk with tom coburn -- >> this weekend to can talk to tom coburn on tv "in debpth." join the conversation
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)